The Stockade Bed and Breakfast

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Food and Beverages

Banana Nut Bread (or Muffins)

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This is my own adaptation of this classic recipe.

½ c. sugar
½ c. brown sugar
½ c. butterBanana Nut Bread Photo
1 tsp. vanilla
2 eggs
½ c. whole-wheat flour
1½ c. regular flour
1 tsp. baking powder
1 level tsp. baking soda (in a few drops of water)
1 pinch salt
1 c. pecans, chopped
3 to 4 very ripe bananas

Preheat Oven to 325°

Combine cream sugar, brown sugar, butter, and vanilla.

Add eggs to mixture.

Mash bananas.

Add bananas and salt to the mixture.

Then add baking powder to flour and pour gradually into mix.

If you use nuts, add them next.

And lastly, baking soda.

Mix well and divide into 2 loaves.

Bake in greased loaf pans at 325° for 40 to 50 minutes; test with a straw.

Meyer Lemon Meringue Pie

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6-year old grating lemons

This Meyer Lemon Meringue Pie recipe is so easy, even a 6 year old can make it. It is the fresh homegrown lemons that makes it so delicious.

 

 

 

1 baked pie shell (brush with egg white before baking)
1 can of sweetened condensed milk
3 large eggs separated (Use yolks in filling and make meringue out of whites.)
1/2 c. Meyer lemon juice
1 tsp. grated zest of lemonChild eating pie
¼ tsp. cream of tartar
¼ c sugar

Mix condensed milk, 3 egg yolks, lemon juice and zest of lemon and pour into baked shell. Chill.

Tess with Meyer Lemon Tree Front YardWhip 3 egg whites with 1/4 tsp cream of tarter. Add 1/4 c. sugar after egg whites are partially whipped. Beat until stiff, spread over chilled filling and bake at 350 degrees until brown. Chill.

 

Cream of Broccoli Soup

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Cream of Broccoli Soup¾ c. chopped onion
1 carrot, sliced thin
2 tsp. mustard seeds
2 Tbsp. unsalted butter
¾ pound broccoli, chopped coarse (about 3½ cups)
2 c. chicken broth
1 c. water
1½ tsp. fresh lemon juice, or to taste
¼ c. sour cream

In a heavy saucepan cook the onion, carrot, mustard seeds, and salt and pepper to taste in the butter over moderate heat, stirring, until the onion is soft. Add the broccoli, the broth, and the water and simmer the mixture, covered, for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the broccoli is very tender. In a blender, purée the soup in batches until it is smooth, transferring it as it is puréed to another heavy saucepan. Whisk in the lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste, heat the soup over moderately low heat, and whisk in the sour cream (do not let the soup boil).

This is a light soup with wonderful flavor.

Creamy Egg Nog

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6 egg yolksEgg Nog
6 egg whites
¾ cups sugar
2 cups whipping cream
2 cups milk
1 cup brandy
Nutmeg

Beat egg yolks until thick and lemon-colored. Gradually add ¾ cups sugar, beating well. Stir in whipping cream, milk and brandy. Beat egg whites until soft peaks form. Fold into brandy mixture. Chill thoroughly. Sprinkle with nutmeg.

Serves 8 cups

DeeDee’s Christmas Cookies

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DeeDee’s Christmas Cookies

LemonCookies2My great Aunt Concetta “DeeDee” DeLerno was a great cook, or so I am told. Unfortunately, I never met Aunt DeeDee. But, even though I know I am my mother’s daughter, every time I look in the mirror (I am the spitting image of her), I also know that I am related to my grandfather’s sister, Concetta DeLerno. I make up my own recipes, I like the science of cooking as much as the ritual, and I KNOW food. I have Mediterranean blood, love red wine, garlic and olive oil. I am Italian even though I don’t look it. I wish I had gotten to know Aunt DeeDee and would have loved to cook with her! This simple cookie recipe reminds me of my roots in Ustica and Brindisi, Italy. I use my Meyer Lemons off the bush in the front yard. Thanks for the recipe Aunt DeeDee!

Ingredients:
½ lb. butter
4 cups flour
1 2/3 cups sugar
1 whole lemon (grated and juice)
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons cream of tarter

Directions:

Sift flour once. Sift flour again with cream of tartar and baking soda.

Cream butter and sugar together. Add eggs, vanilla and lemon. Fold in flour mixture.

Roll out with rolling pin and use cookie cutter.

Bake at 350 for about 10 minutes.

Bananas Foster Pain Perdu

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Bananas Foster Pain Perdu2

 

I started making this recipe when the Ice Cream Banana plant which one of my guests from Florida brought me produced a bumper crop.  Everybody loves it!

 

 

 

 

1 loaf of French Bread sliced

2 eggs, beaten

2 cups half and half

1 oz. Praline Liquor

Butter

Pecans

Brown sugar

Sliced banana

Blueberries (optional)

Powdered sugar (optional)

Whipped cream (optional)

 

Mix together the beaten eggs, half and half, and Praline liquor.

Soak bread in mixture and sauté in butter on both sides until brown.

In separate sauce pan, sauté in butter,  pecans, Praline liquor, and brown sugar until it makes a syrup. Add banana slices and cook till soft.

Pour syrup over French toast and garnish with blueberries, powdered sugar and whipped cream.

 

 

Breakfast at a B&B

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Stockade-46When you travel, how important is breakfast to you?  If you enjoy unique, creative and delicious breakfast creations, you may want to consider staying at a bed and breakfast.  In fact, breakfast may be one of the main reasons you choose a bed and breakfast instead of a hotel.

A favorite phrase in the Bed and Breakfast industry is that “Breakfast” is half the name.  In many B&Bs, your breakfast may be the most memorable part of your stay, not only for the food but the intimate and leisurely experience as well. Guests sometimes meet other guests and oftentimes breakfasts in a B&B can last for an hour or more as guests meet each other, talk about the area, their experiences and where they are from.

If breakfast is important to you, it is advised that you ask the innkeeper prior to your stay what type of breakfast will be served.  Just as styles of B&Bs vary, so do breakfast offerings.  It can be as simple as a continental breakfast of coffee, tea and pastries brought to your room or served in a country-style dining room.  Or it can be as elegant as menu items prepared by a chef in an beautiful dining room setting.  A delicious breakfast may be the one thing you remember most about a particular inn.

Most innkeepers enjoy using foods indigenous to their area in the preparation of the menu.  Sometimes the ingredients are grown Stockade-49on the property itself – herbs, fresh vegetables, etc.  Oftentimes, when serving, the chef or cook will come out and tell you what you are eating and what ingredients were used to make the dish. When’s the last time you went to a hotel and received that type of personal service?

When comparing prices of hotels versus bed and breakfasts, remember that usually the breakfast is included in the room rental of a B&B, which is not always the case in hotels.  Innkeepers consider the breakfast experience an important part of your stay and put a lot of thought and preparation into the foods that will be served.

The Stockade serves a traditional Southern breakfast.  Guests wake up to the aroma of Community Coffee, Louisiana’s brand.  The menu varies daily with delicacies such as garlic cheese grits, egg soufflé, French omelets, hickory-smoked bacon, country ham, biscuits, croissants, muffins, French toast and fresh fruit. Upon request, special dietary needs are accommodated.

Breakfast RoomThe Stockade breakfast room contains antiques, with John Gould hummingbird prints, botanical prints from the Temple of Flora collection by Robert John Thornton and antique collectible menus.

Hungry yet?  Bon appetit, and as we say in South Louisiana, “laissez les bon temps rouler” (let the good times roll)!

 

Local Chefs Host Haunted Pop-Up Fundraiser at The Stockade

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On October 30, local chefs Jay Ducote and Chris Wadsworth hosted a Haunted House Pop-Up Dinner at The Stockade Bed and Breakfast on Highland Road. The event was held to raise money for Wadsworth’s new training venture, Triumph Kitchen, a non-profit education venue that will serve as a training facility to teach culinary, hospitality and life skills to at-risk youth.

Chefs Jay Ducote and Chris Wadsworth at The Stockade Bed and Breakfast

Chefs Jay Ducote and Chris Wadsworth at The Stockade Bed and Breakfast

For the dinner, Ducote and Wadsworth prepared a thirteen- course meal full of tricks and treats. Creepy courses included smoked duck heart in smoked carrot skin, vampire-repelling garlic risotto, “Ghost Bites” (marshmallow and rum chatta foam), and “poisoned apple” bread pudding.

The event raised more than $800 for Triumph Kitchen, which is currently set to open in January of next year.

“The Haunted Pop-Up was a one-of-a-kind event complete with spooktacular food, wine from Louisiana’s own Landry Vineyards, and a setting that is truly a gem for Baton Rouge,” said Ducote. “The Stockade B&B provided a perfect backdrop for the Halloween-themed pop-up dinner. We had an amazing turnout, a lot of fun, and raised a lot of money for Triumph Kitchen while doing it!”

How To Tailgate Like a PREAUX

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Football season is upon us, which means that it’s time for tailgating! Here are some things to keep in mind before you head out to your next Tiger Stadium tailgate.

1. Dress the part

There are only two sartorial rules of tailgate fashion at LSU: 1. Wear purple. 2. Wear gold. Anyone who shows up to the game wearing the opposing team’s colors will find themselves on the receiving end of the dreaded “Tiger Bait” chant, and nobody enjoys that.

2. Stock up on beverages.

A Southern tailgate wouldn’t be complete without a few cold ones. Luckily, in addition to mouthwatering cuisine, Louisiana also has a lot to offer in terms of locally-brewed beers. Abita Brewing Company, Parish Brewing Company and Bayou Teche Brewing all make excellent local brews that allow you to support Louisiana business while you cheer on the Tigers.

3. Cook a mean brisket.

A crucial element of a great tailgate is great food. Here’s a recipe for brisket from our good friend Chef Kenny that will leave your guests in awe:

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 pounds beef brisket
  • ½ c. olive oil
  • ¼ c. balsamic vinegar
  • ¼ c. honey
  • 2 c. red wine
  • 1 onion (cut up
  • Tony Chachere’s seasoning
  • Garlic powder

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C).

2. In a roasting pan, place brisket fat side up. Rub seasoning all over brisket.

In a small bowl, combine rest of ingredients and pour over brisket.

3. Cover with foil, and bake in preheated oven for 3 to 4 hours. Uncover the brisket during the last hour of cooking.

[NB: You can also put the cooked brisket on the BBQ pit for a little while to crisp the outside and use your favorite BBQ sauce. Many people don’t realize that the trick to cooking beef brisket and beef ribs is to cook them in the oven first, then transfer them to the pit for a short time; the oven cooking is what tenderizes the meat, and the pit puts the char on the meat.]

 

Now what are you waiting for? GEAUX out and enjoy an awesome tailgate party!

 

Local Brews

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In addition to mouthwatering cuisine, Louisiana also has a lot to offer in terms of locally-brewed beers. Here are a few:

Founded in 1986, the Abita Brewing Company is located 30 miles north of New Orleans. In its first year, the brewery produced 1,500 barrels of beer. By 1994, the company outgrew their original site and moved up the road to a larger facility to keep up with demand. Abita brews over 151,000 barrels of beer and 9,100 barrels of root beer in their state-of-the-art brewing facility.

Parish Brewing Company was founded in 2008 by a man who worked as a chemical engineer before leaving the corporate world to become a brewmaster. Brewed in Lafayette Parish, Parish beer takes pride in being fresh — it has no preservatives and is never pasteurized.

Bayou Teche Brewing‘s founder dreamed of creating a beer that would pair with the Cajun cuisine he grew up eating. He taught himself to brew beer and made several different styles of beers until he found recipes that complemented Cajun and Creole food. He then returned to Arnaudville, where he taught his brothers his secrets and worked with them to brew their first batches of beer together. Bayou Teche Brewing was founded by the Knott brothers in 2009.